Episode 38

Episode #36 - Filling Our Truck With Forgiveness: An Interview With Mia McGlynn

Many episodes that we have featured have included the choice between two paths. However, this unique path that our guest today shares, Mia McGlynn, an accomplished children's books author, photographer, and marketing entrepreneur, certainly shows how you can take advantage of adversity, setbacks, and pain all by forgiving yourself and others no matter what they have done. This impactful episode shares the knowledge of what someone with a truly incredible mindset can do to work with all shapes and sizes of problems, even if they are big construction vehicles taking away the problems that we all face. No matter the struggle, "seeding" yourself in the roots of positivity can give a much rewarding career and personal relationships with individuals.

Guest Bio

Mia is a PA based photographer & writer. She has published 4 children's books, Bigger Diggers being the newest. This book is based and illustrated on photographs she took during her "dayjob" as a marketing manager for a heavy equipment dealership. The story promotes finding unique strengths and differences, and coming together as a team. There's a sequel in the works currently being illustrated. Her books focus on teaching important lessons and empowering kids, while also shining a light on real life roles and jobs. She is very passionate about the skilled trades and recently trained as an ambassador for a nonprofit called The Crew Collaborative, which aims to help educate and inform youth on blue collar/construction industries and to help break the stigma surrounding these areas. Aside from my books and marketing position, she runs her own photography business which allows her to serve the community in various ways from portraits and weddings, to commercial and product photos and digital marketing.

She is also a certified Level III Reiki Practitioner and transformation life coach. She is currently working on a self help/memoir in the hopes that by sharing her experiences, it will help others during times of struggle. Having grown up as a foster sibling to many children, and going through 2 divorces when it came time to build my own family, and then going on to blend a modern day "Brady Bunch", she is able to offer a vast and unique perspective on relationships, communication, and creating a life with passion and love.

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100090176190063&mibextid=ZbWKwL

@Miamcglynnphotography on Instagram

Website: http://www.miamcglynnbooks.com

Facebook Handle: @midlife_mediator

Facebook & Instagram Handle For Books: @miamcglynnbooks

Facebook and Instagram Handle For Photography: @miamcglynnphotography

  • National Institute of Mental Health ยป Suicide Prevention (https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/suicide-prevention) - Taking care of our mental health is entirely important, especially if you, or someone you know, is in a mental crisis. Take a few moments to review the different techniques you can employ to ensure someone is safe, and call 988 if you are experiencing a crisis.
  • Crew Collaborative | About Us (https://crewcollab.org/about-us/) - The Crew Collaborative is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization using innovative tactics to strengthen the blue-collar workforce, establishing the community around the world and change the stigma surrounding careers in construction through education, conversation, events, and advocacy. This website provides more information about the organization and what you can do to get involved.

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Intro/Outro By: Michael Dugan, Podcast Host: Voice4Chefs

Transcript
Intro:

Welcome to the podcast where relationships, confidence, and

Intro:

determination, all converge into an amazing, heartfelt experience.

Intro:

This is Speaking From The Heart.

Joshua:

Welcome back to episode number 36 of Speaking From the Heart in which

Joshua:

we've been featuring businesses this past few weeks in which have made a

Joshua:

substantial impact not only in the lives of others, but they also share from

Joshua:

the heart, and I want to continue to thank all the businesses that help to

Joshua:

support the start of this podcast that have allowed me to be able to have the

Joshua:

variety of different guests that have supported me in getting this completely

Joshua:

and utterly off the ground, so thank you to all those that have preceded this that

Joshua:

have certainly helped me to become the best version of myself as a podcast host.

Joshua:

Today, we have Mia McGlynn, who is a PA based photographer and writer.

Joshua:

She's published four children's books, which we talk extensively about because

Joshua:

that is really a big passion of hers.

Joshua:

The most recent one being Bigger Diggers.

Joshua:

This book is based on photographs that she's taken during her quote, unquote day

Joshua:

job as a marketing manager for a heavy equipment dealership, and in that story,

Joshua:

she promotes finding unique strengths and differences and coming together as a team.

Joshua:

There's a sequel currently in the works being illustrated and in

Joshua:

her books overall, they focus on teaching important lessons and

Joshua:

empowering kids while also shining a light on real life roles and jobs.

Joshua:

She's very passionate about skilled trades, more specifically blue collar

Joshua:

jobs, which we get into a little bit with this episode, and she actually

Joshua:

is an ambassador of also a nonprofit called The Crew Collaborative, which

Joshua:

we'll talk about quite a lot also, aiming to help educate and inform

Joshua:

the youth on blue collar construction industries and to break the stigma

Joshua:

that's usually surrounding these areas.

Joshua:

Besides her marketing, she does do photography in which we talk about

Joshua:

some of the things, including some of the portraits and weddings that she's

Joshua:

done, including even the commercial and product photos and digital marketing

Joshua:

that she creates as a content creator.

Joshua:

She also is a reiki practitioner and also a transformational life coach.

Joshua:

I know also just working and talking with her, she has been one of those guests

Joshua:

again that works on so many different things, but they all have a different

Joshua:

type of thread to it each time that I talk to someone and hers is no exception in

Joshua:

which she talks about the divorces that have made her into the modern Brady Bunch

Joshua:

that I absolutely enjoy hearing about how she creates that communications, those

Joshua:

relationships with other people, but more importantly, having the determination

Joshua:

to live life with passion and love.

Joshua:

With that, let's go to the episode.

Joshua:

All right.

Joshua:

We have Mia McGlynn with us.

Joshua:

Mia, thanks for sharing your heart with us today.

Mia:

Thank you for having me here.

Mia:

I'm excited to get to chat with you.

Joshua:

I am too, and I really enjoyed our conversation even beforehand because

Joshua:

I felt like we got to know each other.

Joshua:

I feel like there's some energies aligning in the universe when it comes to that

Joshua:

too, and I already let the audience know even before we got started with this

Joshua:

about what you exactly do, and I just want to start off with this question first.

Joshua:

I know that you have written a lot of different books, and I know you got a

Joshua:

book that you're working on right now.

Joshua:

I really want to dig into, what was your main motivation for being an author,

Joshua:

because I've had some authors on the show already and they've told me a lot

Joshua:

about what some of their motivations are, and I've been really fascinated

Joshua:

with what their story is as it comes to that, so do you mind sharing your story

Joshua:

as to how you started writing stories?

Mia:

For sure, I would love to.

Mia:

Actually I grew up around children a lot, so far my

Mia:

publications are children's books.

Mia:

I have four books already out, and then I have another one coming that

Mia:

should be coming probably early next year, if not by late this year.

Mia:

It's actually a sequel to Bigger Diggers, so I'm pretty excited to get

Mia:

that out there, but I'm also working on a memoir, so that'll be for adults.

Mia:

I worked with children at a very young age.

Mia:

My job was at a daycare facility.

Mia:

My parents took in foster kids.

Mia:

I was actually the only biological child until I was eight years old, and I

Mia:

really wanted siblings, so I have always really valued the role model scenario.

Mia:

I've always felt like I wanted to live a life that was an example

Mia:

to others that maybe they needed a helping hand or a guide.

Mia:

When I got into a place in my life where, something just hit me.

Mia:

These ideas started to come to me and I thought, "You know what?

Mia:

I'm just going to run with it.", and I started with a story called When You

Mia:

Give a Girl a Hammer, and it was actually inspired by my nieces and my sister.

Mia:

We come from a background of strong women, and I remember my mom in our

Mia:

youth, coming home from school and she had stuck a hammer through the

Mia:

wall because she decided that that wall was no longer going to be there.

Mia:

She was going to turn that into a nice loft, and so that's the example that

Mia:

I had growing up, and then to watch my little sister raising her little girls

Mia:

in the same kind of mindset as she was rehabbing a house, it just took this form

Mia:

in my mind and I just penned When You Give A Girl A Hammer, and from there,

Mia:

it just opened something for me and I created, When You Give A Mom A Minute,

Mia:

out of inspiration, again, from people in my life, people like myself who are

Mia:

really juggling the role of being a mom, the most important one, but also

Mia:

really career driven, entrepreneurial, and trying to really make a go of it

Mia:

and still wanting to communicate to their children that they are everything.

Mia:

Even in those moments where we're not actively seeming like we are thinking

Mia:

about our kids, we really are, like, they're always on our minds no matter

Mia:

what we're doing, so that story came from that place and it continued to

Mia:

kind of roll into the next thing and I just kept creating and I love it.

Mia:

I can't stop.

Joshua:

I love the fact that you are very creative and that you don't stop, because

Joshua:

I know that you also own a photography business, which we shared, and I've had

Joshua:

a photographer on the show before where we talked about what are some of the

Joshua:

things that are really important to them when they are working with clients or

Joshua:

even taking their photographs, and I'm always interested in this too, so I was

Joshua:

wondering if you can talk to us a little bit about when you're working with people

Joshua:

or you're working on a particular event or even first off, describe what kind

Joshua:

of photography that you do for us, and then secondly, what do you really look

Joshua:

for when you're taking that photography?

Joshua:

Is there a certain element that you're trying to get?

Joshua:

Is it the lighting?

Joshua:

Is it the reflection of the character of a person, the place, or the thing?

Joshua:

Can you share us a little bit about that, because I'm always fascinated by like what

Joshua:

people see and how they interpret that.

Mia:

It's so interesting when you ask any photographer about this sort of

Mia:

thing, you get a different answer, right?

Joshua:

Yes.

Joshua:

I love that so much.

Mia:

I actually was- yeah, I was actually in a conversation with someone

Mia:

earlier today, and it was a meeting about a total different thing, and

Mia:

there was art on their wall, and I said, "Oh, who's the photographer?"

Mia:

Well here, it turned out it was that person, and it stemmed this whole

Mia:

other conversation because we were from different places with what we

Mia:

liked and what we looked for, and so I do largely portrait photography.

Mia:

I do wedding photography, so my area is focused largely around people.

Mia:

I like interacting with people.

Mia:

I like having them and helping people find a different way to see

Mia:

themselves or see their best selves.

Mia:

My favorite is working with seniors one-on-one, like senior class, getting

Mia:

that little bit of time with them to let them really express their personality

Mia:

and let their characters shine through at this time in their life where everything

Mia:

is just changing for them and they're gonna be leaving behind this one area

Mia:

that they've known for so many years, and some of them moving on to college,

Mia:

some making some other adult decisions, and so it's this one like pivotal

Mia:

milestone, and I get to just have fun with them and really let some of those

Mia:

things come alive, so I love that.

Mia:

I am big into working with light and shadow.

Mia:

I love some deep car contrasts that also comes into play because I also

Mia:

do commercial photography, so I photograph things like heavy equipment.

Mia:

That's part of a part-time day job as well, so that's

Mia:

part of what I do for them.

Mia:

I photograph heavy equipment, which coincidentally, was the inspiration

Mia:

for Bigger Diggers, so all of my things kind of marry each other and everything

Mia:

grows as a whole from what I produce, but I do love different contrasts

Mia:

in textures and enlightened shadow.

Mia:

I can't really niche down as well as a lot of people say you should,

Mia:

because I like so many different things and I get bored very easily,

Mia:

so that tends to work in various ways.

Mia:

It allows me to kind of go left or right, whenever I feel the need,

Mia:

and I have a lot of fun with it.

Joshua:

I see that you have a lot of fun of it because I've been scrolling through

Joshua:

your photos as we were talking and I didn't have a chance really to scroll

Joshua:

at them closely before we started, but I just find it so fascinating, like how

Joshua:

you do use that contrast, that lighting and shadow, these are incredible photos

Joshua:

and of all different locations, all kinds of different people, all kinds

Joshua:

of different types of situations.

Joshua:

I'm like mesmerized as you were talking, I'm like over here like, "Oh my gosh.

Joshua:

These are really good."

Mia:

Oh, thank you.

Joshua:

When you were talking about heavy equipment, can you tell us

Joshua:

a little bit like what that is, like, are you talking about like big

Joshua:

tractors and things of that nature?

Mia:

I am talking about like big haul trucks.

Joshua:

Wow.

Mia:

The inspiration for one of my characters in Bigger Diggers is

Mia:

actually like the biggest rigid haul truck that Volvo makes right now.

Mia:

I got to go to a site, to a demonstration of that.

Mia:

I got to ride in it front row seat and see out.

Mia:

I took pictures of that whole event and looking at them, I looked at the

Mia:

face of that thing and I was like, "This looks like it should have eyes.

Mia:

It looks like it is a character of some sort", and there became Harry Haller.

Mia:

That's how he was developed.

Mia:

It's my favorite one.

Mia:

I have gotten to drive the A 60 articulated hauler.

Mia:

They call those wiggle wagons.

Mia:

That was weird.

Joshua:

Yeah.

Mia:

That was weird to drive because I'm not used to that articulated thing,

Mia:

so backing up becomes a whole nother.

Mia:

I just can't-

Joshua:

Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait.

Joshua:

They let you actually go in and actually drive this thing?

Mia:

I did.

Mia:

I did.

Mia:

One of the guys did take me and let me drive it.

Mia:

Yeah.

Joshua:

That is so cool.

Joshua:

I grew up on a farm, and I didn't tell you this, but my parents had Alpine

Joshua:

Nubian Dairy goats, and I used to drive the dad's tractor around, so

Joshua:

it was not like these big tractors.

Joshua:

It was a Ford tractor.

Joshua:

It had a Bush Hog front end loader so that you were able to lift things around.

Joshua:

I had nothing like what you just drove, and I'm just like,

Joshua:

"Oh man, I wish I was there.

Joshua:

I would've had fun."

Mia:

Oh my God, but that farm life is like something that is like after my own heart.

Mia:

I actually traveled out to Idaho and they were planting the potato fields,

Mia:

and because I have a friend that's a potato farmer and it's just, it's

Mia:

mesmerizing to me like the what the science behind everything for that.

Mia:

It's just amazing, so as you can see, I have a love for such a

Mia:

vast amount of things in life.

Mia:

I think I would just experience all the things if I could.

Joshua:

I've loved that because I've had people on this show

Joshua:

that have really expressed their interests for international travel.

Joshua:

I've had international guests that've talked about their enjoyment

Joshua:

to going different countries, even in the United States.

Joshua:

It's incredible just to have all this wide variety of different likes and interest.

Joshua:

With that said, I know that you have been through a very unique journey to

Joshua:

get to this point, and I was wondering, because you have gone through two

Joshua:

divorces, and I have to be honest and transparent, I have never been married,

Joshua:

and I don't know how that exactly feels per se, to go through that sort of

g, but my question is twofold:

a.

g, but my question is twofold:

Have any of these experiences with your relationships been a motivation for you

g, but my question is twofold:

to enter into the careers that you've been doing with writing the books, or even

g, but my question is twofold:

going through and taking these awesome photography sessions with people, places,

g, but my question is twofold:

and things, and then the other thing is: is there anything that you would've

g, but my question is twofold:

changed differently when it comes to going through those experiences, meaning, would

g, but my question is twofold:

you feel like it would've made you the person that you are today if you didn't

g, but my question is twofold:

go through those things, and I know those are pretty deep questions, but I

g, but my question is twofold:

think that for some people, and I'll give you a moment to think about it, I was

g, but my question is twofold:

thinking about this even before we even started, is that some people go through

g, but my question is twofold:

life stuck in those sort of situations.

g, but my question is twofold:

Sometimes they never even take that sort of action or that first step, so

g, but my question is twofold:

they never get to unlock some of those things or they get trapped in those sort

g, but my question is twofold:

of circumstances and they never really overcome that, and I feel like for you,

g, but my question is twofold:

just hearing what I've heard so far, you have overcome that and so much more, so I

g, but my question is twofold:

was wondering if you could share with us a little bit about that in answering some of

g, but my question is twofold:

those things that I've mentioned to you.

Mia:

Yeah.

Mia:

I guess what I could say is, I did get inspired to do some of the things that I

Mia:

do by my life experience, and I think that one of those things is when you're forced,

Mia:

and I don't mean to to take away anything as male, female, too much, but as a female

Mia:

it was kind of a unique scenario to that.

Mia:

I had to start over multiple times after having kind of relied on a male partner

Mia:

situation very heavily, especially in my first marriage, I started out being very

Mia:

independent, but I gave away a lot of my independence, and what came about after

Mia:

that was a raging, independent woman, you know, I felt that I didn't ever want

Mia:

to go through the experience of having literally nothing again, like nothing.

Mia:

No home, no car, nothing to call my own.

Mia:

There was nothing-

Joshua:

I was going to say, you lost everything as a result of this?

Mia:

Yeah, my first marriage ended, I was 25.

Mia:

I had two kids that were just under two.

Mia:

They were 14 months apart, and it fell apart, and it fell apart dramatically, and

Mia:

it was not an easy or amicable divorce.

Mia:

There was a fight every step of the way.

Mia:

It took three years to complete that divorce and it was three years of struggle

Mia:

and went on to be many, many more years of very difficult and trying times

Mia:

with that person, and that definitely inspired me to be gritty enough to

Mia:

go after doing things on my own.

Mia:

There is something to be said for just working at it and trying it

Mia:

out, like, if it doesn't work out fine, what did I have to lose?

Mia:

It took me a really long time to get to that point where I realized

Mia:

you can take a little risk because really what do you have to lose?

Mia:

What's money?

Mia:

You can get more later.

Mia:

If it all goes today, you can still get more tomorrow.

Mia:

There's more out there to be made, so take the chance, do the thing.

Mia:

If it doesn't work out, dust yourself off and do the next thing.

Mia:

That's how I've learned to be about it, but it took a really long time and it

Mia:

took going through, getting to where I could get married a second time was

Mia:

a whole process in and of itself, and then that marriage, actually, it took

Mia:

me four years to get down the aisle and then three years being married, and

Mia:

that fell apart also very dramatically.

Mia:

These are things that I do dish in this memoir that I'm doing right now because,

Mia:

and the whole purpose of this is because I realized over time that these things

Mia:

that I experienced were challenging and could have been handled in some extremely

Mia:

ugly ways, and I could have allowed them to destroy me as a person, to make me

Mia:

bitter, to make me fill my heart with hate, and that was an underlying lesson

Mia:

in the whole thing was I was not willing to let myself become hardened because

Mia:

of these experiences, because of what other people did, the decisions that

Mia:

they made that affected me, I wasn't going to let that become who I was, so

Mia:

I feel like other people need to know that they can get through things too.

Mia:

They can do hard things, and they don't have to let it make their heart hard.

Mia:

They don't have to let it fill them up with hate.

Joshua:

I'm speechless because I, first off, I want to say this.

Joshua:

You hit the nail in the head about the difference between what a woman goes

Joshua:

through and what a male goes through, and I certainly don't want to downplay

Joshua:

anything that anybody goes through, because I think for either side of it,

Joshua:

it can be traumatic in its own ways, but hearing your side of it, Mia, I really

Joshua:

think that for some people it's really hard to get to that side of thinking.

Joshua:

"Oh, I need to do something about it, and I know that I, it's going to be messy,

Joshua:

but I still need to do something about it", but they get stuck with that thought,

Joshua:

and I've worked with clients that, in a life coaching perspective, since I do

Joshua:

that for my business, I've had people that are like, "I'm just stuck in this,

Joshua:

and I don't know whether there's going to be any freedom.", so I have to coach

Joshua:

them through not only the goals that they have to set for themselves, but I'm taking

Joshua:

a big risk because some of them might be female, some of them might be male.

Joshua:

I'm putting my perspective out there, but I need to be respectful of what the

Joshua:

whole picture is, the bigger picture, and I think that is so important to

Joshua:

distinguish, so I really resonated with that in you discussing it because

Joshua:

the other thing you said, and this is actually a follow up then, because of

Joshua:

what you saying is that you really asked yourself the question, do I have to

Joshua:

hate this or do I do something about it?

Joshua:

What chose you to do something about it as opposed to be being filled with

Joshua:

hate, because I know a lot of people that, and especially nowadays, especially

Joshua:

in the United States, which most of my listeners are from with this podcast,

Joshua:

I know that it's so easy to be in that default position of, "I'm going to hate

Joshua:

you because you did not do the right thing, and I can never forgive you."

Mia:

Mm-hmm.

Joshua:

Where I feel like there should be forgiveness with that, so can you

Joshua:

answer why you chose the path you did?

Mia:

That is a really tough thing to answer because I feel like I

Mia:

always said, and I've said this to my children, even forgiving has

Mia:

always been really easy for me.

Joshua:

Mm-hmm.

Mia:

Like in anything in life, and I feel like that's something that a lot

Mia:

of people really, really struggle with, but the best way that I've said it to

Mia:

my own clients even is by giving someone your forgiveness, you're not necessarily

Mia:

gifting anything to them, you're giving that to yourself because if you let hate

Mia:

fill your heart, that's your baggage that becomes something that you carry.

Mia:

They don't know.

Mia:

They don't care, you know what I mean, like, when that relationship is severed,

Mia:

when there is animosity between two people, that person's over somewhere

Mia:

else going through their daily life, do you think they really care how you feel?

Joshua:

Mm-hmm.

Mia:

Do you think that they're thinking about the fact that you're angry at them?

Mia:

No.

Mia:

They probably like it, so to me, it's almost an act of self-love and also

Mia:

rebellion, if you want to call it that way, by saying, "You know what,

Mia:

I'm going to forgive you for me.

Mia:

This is better for my well-being."

Joshua:

"I want to forgive you for me."

Joshua:

Wow.

Joshua:

Hearing those words, I'm in this phase of my life myself, and even my audience

Joshua:

knows this from some of the episodes I've done as monologues, where I'm sort of

Joshua:

reflecting on, what can I do differently instead of just going to the default

Joshua:

reaction of, "Oh, that's a terrible idea", or, "That's really not a good thing

Joshua:

to do, Joshua.", or reacting to those things that have that venomous, poisonous

Joshua:

sort of feeling that gets stabbed inside of you and wanting to remove

Joshua:

that, but you're essentially pulling that whole thing out and saying, "Look.

Joshua:

I am going to forgive you because I'm not going to let that be the power

Joshua:

over me", and now it resonates with me what you said earlier about not only

Joshua:

giving women that chance, because I've been working with women on a nonprofit

Joshua:

board myself, where I've interacted with them, where they've been beaten

Joshua:

down physically, mentally, emotionally, socially, having a economic sort of job.

Joshua:

I've seen it all and it just, my heart breaks for those people

Joshua:

that really need something to kind of help them through that.

Mia:

Yeah.

Mia:

They need empowerment.

Joshua:

Yeah, and that's actually my question for you is it a

Joshua:

about empowerment for you?

Joshua:

That was your source of strength to kind of share that with others?

Joshua:

I guess what I'm asking is, We have an audience here that have been people

Joshua:

that have gone through whole kinds of different things in their lives.

Joshua:

What would be your advice to somebody saying what you've said,

Joshua:

because these are all great nuggets that I think are really important.

Joshua:

If you were to sum it up into a nice, maybe a couple sentences or so, what

Joshua:

would you say to somebody that would open up to you and say, "I'm going through

Joshua:

this and I'm not sure what to do?"

Joshua:

What would be your advice to them?

Mia:

One of the things that immediately comes to mind is actually completely

Mia:

separate from my own divorce experiences.

Mia:

This was something that came later.

Mia:

My daughter went through anorexia.

Mia:

She is now healthy and doing well, but there was a period as a teenager

Mia:

that I worried about her taking her own life every single day.

Mia:

There was such dark, dark places and such deep anxiety and depression, and

Mia:

I often just was grasping at straws to try to make sure that I could be there

Mia:

for her, and one of the moments that I remember that was really integral

Mia:

and that I know that she kept in mind, is that you can feel what you feel.

Mia:

You have every right to feel that way.

Mia:

You need to acknowledge those things and feel them, but don't live there.

Mia:

Give it a little bit of time.

Mia:

Give it a little bit of room, but don't stay in that place, and I know that's

Mia:

something that she has used going forward, and one of the other things that I did

Mia:

tell her as well was, "When you're in your darkest moment, there has to be that

Mia:

little spark somewhere deep down inside."

Mia:

find that spark and just give it a little bit of air.

Mia:

Just keep breathing on it.

Mia:

Just keep breathing on it because it's going to grow.

Mia:

You get a little bit of empowerment.

Mia:

When I'm coaching women or when I'm talking to my audience, I'm always

Mia:

saying, like, as a photographer too, I get to see a lot of people's insecurities

Mia:

and how they view themselves can be so harsh, and a lot of that comes

Mia:

from what we get from the people we've allowed to get close to us, right?

Mia:

One of the things that I like to say is, "You get compliments", right?

Mia:

Somebody will compliment you.

Mia:

Somebody will say something nice about you, and we all feel so awkward

Mia:

immediately it's like, "Oh my God, I don't know what to say", and you

Mia:

downplay it because, oh my gosh, they can't possibly be talking about

Mia:

who you are as a person, right?

Mia:

It has to be some inanimate thing about what you're wearing or whatever, and I

Mia:

say the person that's complimenting you doesn't have to say anything, and if

Mia:

we think about this, it's more likely that people are going to say bad things.

Mia:

People tend to like to be negative more than, they like to

Mia:

spit positive things outwardly.

Mia:

When someone pays you that compliment, when somebody gives you

Mia:

a positive little nugget, believe it.

Mia:

Hold on to that.

Mia:

Live it.

Mia:

They don't have to be saying that, so I feel like people need to allow

Mia:

themselves to revel in that a little bit more than they usually do, and

Mia:

especially women who have kind of let themselves become beat down, perhaps by

Mia:

a relationship that they've experienced that they're trying to survive after

Mia:

and figure out a way to thrive.

Mia:

You need to let the little things grow for you.

Mia:

You need to believe those things because they carry you through some

Mia:

of those darker, harder moments, so for me, it definitely is about

Mia:

empowering other people to find the pieces of themselves that they can grow

Mia:

and breathe more life to until they become the best version of themselves.

Joshua:

Wow I am just like, yes, I appreciate to the mountains and the

Joshua:

valleys below because it is so important for us to do that, is to create that

Joshua:

image, and I'm sorry, I'm getting emotional here thinking about this because

Joshua:

I've been thinking about all the times, even as a male too, that sometimes even

Joshua:

the male masculinity, we hear so much about, "Oh yeah, you have to be tough.

Joshua:

You can't cry, you can't do this and that, because if you do, that's going

Joshua:

to be looked at as being feminine and you can't look at that way.

Joshua:

You have to be tougher than that.", and I feel that nowadays, that sort of

Joshua:

conversation is still kind of wavering as in terms of what that direction is,

Joshua:

but, what I didn't realize, and I think what you opened my eyes to right now,

Joshua:

is that women are still fighting that battle and still trying to persevere full

Joshua:

through that as much as they possibly can, and I think that there's been a

Joshua:

lot of progress, don't get me wrong, in terms of what you've been able to achieve

Joshua:

as it relates to that, but just being able to have that positive comment, I

Joshua:

can't tell you how many times I wish in my life that I had that growing

Joshua:

up, and I feel like that it all starts with being a kid, so with that said-

Mia:

Yeah.

Joshua:

You are doing some awesome things too to help even adults and maybe even

Joshua:

kids that want to become adults in this field to help them become something

Joshua:

better for themselves, and you're ambassador for a nonprofit called The

Joshua:

Crew Collaborative, and I'm wondering if you could spend a few minutes sharing

Joshua:

that with us, because it sounds like exactly what all of us need is to hear

Joshua:

some positive affirmations, especially with this, so I'm going to shut up.

Joshua:

I'm going to let you talk about it.

Mia:

Yeah, so recently I got to graduate as an ambassador with

Mia:

their Crew Collaborative, which is a nonprofit that aims to educate and

Mia:

kind of strip away the stigma that surrounds working in construction,

Mia:

blue collar jobs, that sort of thing, so I actually learned about this.

Mia:

They founded that nonprofit, I believe it was in 2020, and I had seen it

Mia:

through my own work with dealing with the heavy equipment and stuff and kind

Mia:

of have kept my eye on it, and then one day I saw a call for ambassadors and

Mia:

different ways that you can be helping out with their nonprofit, and I just

Mia:

thought, I need to be a part of this.

Mia:

There is something that just really pulls on my heartstrings because I feel that

Mia:

blue collar life and construction work and things like that are things that

Mia:

are getting kind of pulled away from the youth is not getting enough information

Mia:

about it, and people don't realize how they can go about working in the fields.

Mia:

My job being in the blue collar world, I've worked in industry jobs for,

Mia:

gosh, the better part of my career.

Mia:

I used to work as an office manager in a welding shop.

Mia:

I went on to do operations assisting, and now I'm the marketing department for

Mia:

a heavy equipment company, so somehow I've always ended up, and I always think

Mia:

of myself as such a girly girl, but somehow I always end up in these places

Mia:

and industry and I absolutely love it, but had I known back when I was a kid,

Mia:

this was even an option, maybe I wouldn't have waited so long, maybe I would've

Mia:

found it a lot sooner, you know, there are jobs out there that young people

Mia:

don't realize that they can get into, and there are also the jobs that they

Mia:

do realize they can get into, but they have no idea how, so that's kind of

Mia:

what Crew Collaborative is aiming to do.

Mia:

They have a lot of things that they offer programs to get into schools and

Mia:

help educate everybody, so I'm excited to be a part of that and I feel like

Mia:

it's a great fit with what I'm doing with Bigger Diggers because I mean

Mia:

that book, the whole dedication of it was to the blue collar workforce.

Mia:

It was as an encouragement and a thank you to them for choosing this kind of

Mia:

job and having the kind of work ethic that they do, and the hope that they

Mia:

will share that with their children and their children's children because we

Mia:

need that, the backbone of the country.

Mia:

They're building things that we don't think about that we use day to day, but

Mia:

to talk mental health though, something so interesting that construction actually,

Mia:

like what you were saying about men and the whole idea that men can't be soft in

Mia:

any way, that they can't express emotion and stuff, so obviously in an industrial

Mia:

setting and in that trade kind of class of environment, you're expected to be so

Mia:

tough like all of the time, so I'm really hopeful and I'm seeing some development

Mia:

of programs that are kind of gearing up to be able to say, "Hey, you know what?

Mia:

There is a certain amount of awareness we need to start cultivating

Mia:

within this group of people", because the suicide rate is insane.

Mia:

If you look up the statistics, it is among the highest and that speaks volumes to

Mia:

the stress in that life that people are not aware of, and so I would love to see

Mia:

more programs developed in that vein for mental health awareness and that aspect

Mia:

of safety in the workplace really needs to get more attention, and I think even

Mia:

in things like what you and I do with coaching, those are great ways to be

Mia:

able to leverage something because you know, no, not everybody needs to go to

Mia:

a therapist, but, you do need a friend.

Mia:

Sometimes you do need somebody who's going to allow you to bounce things

Mia:

off so that you can decompress and deescalate whatever situation you're

Mia:

feeling in that moment, and then it can help you take on the next day.

Joshua:

Mia, I really appreciate you sharing all of that.

Joshua:

Thanks for sharing about the Crew Collaborative, because I'll going to

Joshua:

put a link into the episode notes about anybody that's interested in being

Joshua:

part of that and being an ambassador.

Joshua:

I think it's really important to not only give equal attention to blue collar

Joshua:

workers, because that's what really allows us to have the infrastructure that we

Joshua:

have today, and that's really important, but more importantly, you nailed it too.

Joshua:

I loved every single thing that you've said tonight has been something that has

Joshua:

been nailed, is that it's really important too to pay attention to the mental health

Joshua:

awareness of other people too, especially those individuals because of that being

Joshua:

so high, and again, my listeners are well familiar with this, but I'm also going to

Joshua:

put a link in the episode notes, if there is a mental health crisis, don't wait.

Joshua:

Reach out to somebody, and 988 is a very important number to have

Joshua:

in the back of your mind whenever somebody's experiencing that.

Joshua:

I'll put some notes in there.

Joshua:

There's a great website, 988, that involves not only the hotline,

Joshua:

but also a whole bunch of things that you can research on your own.

Joshua:

Mia, we're at the end of time, but I want to give you the last few minutes here to

Joshua:

pitch about your life coaching business.

Joshua:

You're a Reiki practitioner also.

Joshua:

I'm not too familiar with the practice.

Mia:

Reiki.

Joshua:

Yes.

Joshua:

Thank you.

Joshua:

Thank you, and I see this is-

Mia:

Reiki.

Mia:

Yeah.

Joshua:

Yeah.

Joshua:

See, this is why I'm learning so much about people as a result of this in

Joshua:

that practice too, so do you mind just describing a little bit about that

Joshua:

as to close us out, about anything that you want to pitch, I should say.

Joshua:

Go ahead.

Mia:

Okay.

Mia:

Yeah.

Mia:

Well, I appreciate the opportunity to mention Midlife Mediator is a part of

Mia:

my website that basically caters to that idea of having that resource when you

Mia:

need to deescalate a situation, so that's available right through my McGlynn books.

Mia:

It's under the personal development section.

Mia:

You can find any of my books there as well, so like I said, right now I have

Mia:

all my children's books available.

Mia:

They're also available on Amazon and coming soon with the follow up

Mia:

to Bigger Diggers, which will be Lucan Two, and you can keep an eye

Mia:

out for my memoirs in the future.

Mia:

I am on TikTok as Midlife Mediator, and that's where I largely post any of

Mia:

my coaching information and any of my information or teaser from my memoir

Mia:

that is currently in progress, and as always, like my photography business is

Mia:

always going strong and I run some digital marketing workshops that are available

Mia:

for people to book for their own site with their team so they can take on the

Mia:

whole marketing thing all on their own, so there's a lot going on in my world

Mia:

and I love teaching people what I know and helping people, so I'm hoping that by

Mia:

sharing this with you and your audience that will reach who it needs to reach.

Joshua:

I think you've done a lot more than just reach out with that last few

Joshua:

moments because you have reached so many people about what you have been

Joshua:

through, but how you've turned it into such a positive transformation for not

Joshua:

only kids, but also for adults too and I really love that not only do you hit

Joshua:

all those angles, but you take that from what's inside your heart, that

Joshua:

choice you made, and I just see it, I hear it tonight from you about that

Joshua:

passion and how much you enjoyed that.

Joshua:

Mia, thanks for Speaking From The Heart with us today.

Joshua:

I really appreciate not only getting to know you better through this

Joshua:

interview, but personally, you've made me realize that I definitely

Joshua:

don't have to be filled with hate.

Joshua:

I really do care about what other people are saying and doing, and that I'm

Joshua:

not going to let the hate enable me.

Joshua:

I'm going to let the positivity enable me, so thank you for sharing today.

Mia:

Yes, thank you for having me.

Mia:

It's been fun.

Joshua:

Maya was one of those guests in which I really had to take a step back

Joshua:

after our episode and think about my own life experiences and what we can do to

Joshua:

ultimately make some of the choices that we have in our lives, and even after our

Joshua:

conversation, we spent some time talking about some of the things that we've been

Joshua:

through both in our lives and including some of the things that had recently

Joshua:

developed even in my own life when it came to working through some of the problems

Joshua:

that even I as a coach and a podcast host, even goes through when it comes to not

Joshua:

only the personal development, but also the professional development as well.

Joshua:

First off, I want to say that it's all about having that right

Joshua:

perspective, and I think that Mia could have easily said, "Yes.

Joshua:

These divorces are going to tear me down.

Joshua:

They are going to make me not feel as complete as I could", and she stood

Joshua:

against that tide in order to say to herself that, "I can do something that

Joshua:

can be incredibly worthwhile", and that's what really made it dynamic for me in that

Joshua:

she was so willing to just put herself on the line knowing that sometimes maybe

Joshua:

even doing that can create some of those tensions, some of that pain, some of those

Joshua:

things that often push us back and forth and holding us to the fire especially,

Joshua:

because that's really tough to be able to do that, but she is a "nothing is

Joshua:

off limits" kind of gal, and I say that exactly because the next morning she

Joshua:

did mention on a post we referencing our Facebook page about the exciting

Joshua:

things that had been happening about her life and that being on this podcast was

Joshua:

something that helped to enjoy and create opportunity for herself and even some

Joshua:

of the people that might be listening to this, and I want to thank her so much

Joshua:

for helping to promote that as well.

Joshua:

It's all about self-help.

Joshua:

It's all about understanding that sometimes we might have to be the ones

Joshua:

that push us to the next level, and I've talked a lot over many, many,

Joshua:

many episodes about the importance of understanding when you need to seek

Joshua:

that help, but now let's change the conversation for a moment to when it

Joshua:

really involves us doing just that: to be able to push ourselves, to have

Joshua:

strong women, to have strong men that help surround us and create some of the

Joshua:

most amazing, heartfelt opportunities, because even as Michael Dugan, the person

Joshua:

that you hear every time that opens this episode or any episode of Speaking from

Joshua:

the Heart says, "When it all converges into a heartfelt experience", it creates

Joshua:

the opportunity to raise people that are not only tough, but they're also

Joshua:

willing to accept when they need to talk to someone about it too, and that's

Joshua:

what I love about Mia is that she's not only just a career oriented person,

Joshua:

but at the same time, she can express her own personality through all the

Joshua:

different things that she opens up with.

Joshua:

Whether that is through contrast and textures with our photography, whether

Joshua:

that is through the books that she has written to help kids get a better

Joshua:

understanding of what's really out there in the world when it comes to

Joshua:

blue collar opportunities and even the important life lessons that those

Joshua:

books offer; but that's exactly it.

Joshua:

We need to be inspired by those life events to be gritty, to be able to be

Joshua:

independent, to know that we need to roll up our sleeves sometimes and say

Joshua:

that we have to put ourselves, our hands and feet bare into the soil, consume

Joshua:

that soil for what it's worth, so that we can grow and nurture ourselves and

Joshua:

into something that is in the cards but are we going to throw ourselves of hate?

Joshua:

Do we really think that anybody really cares how we feel?

Joshua:

There's always that voice.

Joshua:

That's the thing that creates the problems with safety.

Joshua:

I know that many of us can be filled with hate.

Joshua:

I've seen that.

Joshua:

I've been on those Facebook pages, I've been on those LinkedIn pages.

Joshua:

I've been on blogs, ladies and gentlemen, I've been on all of them.

Joshua:

I've seen everything.

Joshua:

I've even had it said to my face, growing up as a kid, I know how

Joshua:

that feels to be treated like dirt.

Joshua:

The bad dirt, not the good dirt, and I know that that can be really, really,

Joshua:

really tough, especially when you really care about what that person's going

Joshua:

through, and they don't care in return.

Joshua:

We can have those very dark places that we sit in, those very dark

Joshua:

places that I've talked about in many of my monologue episodes, in

Joshua:

which I was very scared about the opportunities that presented themselves.

Joshua:

The things that I needed to do to crawl out of the abyss and get into

Joshua:

the light; but do we always have to be dwelling in those dark places?

Joshua:

Do we always have to think that the people, places and things

Joshua:

that we go to are always bad?

Joshua:

As one guest recently put it, it's about being able to have that world life view,

Joshua:

to have that culture of understanding by traveling and seeing where those

Joshua:

places are out there, and I think Mia does that through her imagination and

Joshua:

through her vision of what she sees as the inner beauty which is why I

Joshua:

love the fact that she does marketing.

Joshua:

I love the fact that she does photography.

Joshua:

I love that she expresses herself in her writing because it allows all of

Joshua:

us to understand fully the true picture that we can draw of ourselves if we

Joshua:

had the same tools at our disposal.

Joshua:

Not the same exact tools though, because it's fun to be unique.

Joshua:

It's fun to be different.

Joshua:

It's fun to be on a different type of spectrum, which I've even mentioned

Joshua:

about my autism and how it's impacted me throughout my life, and not knowing the

Joshua:

answer to get to this point has allowed me to have so much freedom, so much

Joshua:

opportunity to realize that I have what it takes, and I think for even Mia I think

Joshua:

that she knows that she has what it takes.

Joshua:

We often have to go through a period of trials in which it pushes us to really

Joshua:

examine whether we are doing the right thing, whether we are getting involved

Joshua:

with all the different types of things that are rolling us into a new future.

Joshua:

Even having those different vehicles that we get to test drive in, whether

Joshua:

they are big construction vehicles, whether they are dark blue Toyota

Joshua:

Prius', which yes, full disclosure, I have a dark blue Toyota Prius.

Joshua:

It doesn't matter though where that vehicle is.

Joshua:

It doesn't matter what it looks like.

Joshua:

It doesn't matter what we do.

Joshua:

We have the tool and we have all the opportunities to use that

Joshua:

tool for our awareness, but it's all about having that spark.

Joshua:

Being able to turn the key over into the ignition creates that chemistry in which

Joshua:

starts your engine so that you're able to propel at whatever speed that you

Joshua:

feel comfortable with, although there are posted speed limits, not only in the

Joshua:

state of Pennsylvania, United States, but all across the world on any roadway that

Joshua:

you travel on, except if you're in the Autobahn, but sometimes we have to have

Joshua:

no speed limit, because sometimes it means that our life is at stake, and I think

Joshua:

that our guest, Mia, certainly examined that sort of possibility with many of

Joshua:

the different choices that she had, but she used those choices to her advantage.

Joshua:

She didn't get dragged down.

Joshua:

She became the best version of herself, and she's allowing herself to have

Joshua:

that opportunity of a lifetime.

Joshua:

I don't know about you, but sometimes having that understanding and having

Joshua:

that conversation with ourselves about what we can potentially become, can

Joshua:

be the most difficult thing that we have ever pursued in our entire lives.

Joshua:

Having strong women though, and having strong men, our moms and dads are even

Joshua:

more important than ever before, and I think being able to understand that,

Joshua:

to have those coworkers that come and surround you and those big moments of

Joshua:

your life, to have family, to be able to do that, whoever you call family,

Joshua:

can be helpful to get you to realize that you are the best of the best.

Joshua:

It's almost as if you are Mr.

Joshua:

Miyagi.

Joshua:

Watching the original Karate Kid, I know that Danielson, you, can be trained to

Joshua:

overcome the odds, to be able to fight back against the Cobra Kai, and be able

Joshua:

to learn so much about yourself and others because it's all about respect

Joshua:

and sometimes getting that respect means that you have to work for it.

Joshua:

You have to roll up your sleeves, you have to do the dirty work, but it doesn't mean

Joshua:

that you have to do it all alone either.

Joshua:

It's all up to you and how you change your mindset that can make it happen

Joshua:

no matter where you're at, and it's all about learning how to grow, how to

Joshua:

achieve, and maybe, just maybe learn how to drive a construction vehicle,

Joshua:

because we all have those precious gifts that we can give to one another.

Joshua:

Thanks for listening to episode number 36 of Speaking from the

Joshua:

Heart, and I look forward to hearing from your heart very soon.

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About the Podcast

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About your host

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Joshua Smith

Joshua D. Smith is the Owner and Founder of Your Speaking Voice, a life coaching, business coaching, and public speaking company based in Carlisle, PA. Serving clients across the world, Joshua got his start in personal/professional development and public speaking in April of 2012 through his extensive involvement in an educational non-profit organization called Toastmasters International.

Toastmasters International operates clubs both domestically and internationally that focus on teaching leadership, development, and public speaking skills. Joshua quickly excelled in Toastmasters International and found that he had a passion for leadership and helping others find their confidence and their true "speaking voice". Joshua has held all club officer roles and most District level positions in Toastmasters International and belongs to numerous clubs throughout the organization. Joshua has also been recognized as two-time Distinguished Toastmaster, the highest award the organization bestows for achievement in leadership and communication.

Joshua continues his active role in the community as he serves a Board Member for the Shalom House, an organization located in the Alison Hill section of Harrisburg, PA that provides emergency shelter services to women and children.

Outside of his community involvement, education is something that Joshua has always taken great pride in. His academic achievements include a number of degrees from Alvernia and Shippensburg University. He earned a Bachelor's degree in political science and communications from Alvernia in 2009, a masters of business administration from Alvernia in 2010, and later a masters in public administration from Shippensburg in 2014.

In the professional world, Joshua has held multiple positions with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for over 12 years which includes a variety of data analytics, procurement, budgeting, business process improvement (IT and non-IT), legal compliance, and working with the blind. He has applied his public speaking and development skills in the professional world to tackle numerous public speaking engagements and presentations from all levels of the organization, including executive management.

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